Opinion World

Total lunar eclipse on Wednesday.

The phenomenon occurs twice a year, when the moon passes into the cone of darkness and shadow of the Earth.

Total lunar eclipse occurs twice a year, when the moon passes into the cone of darkness and shadow of the Earth, said the AFA. The sun, Earth and moon are aligned, so virtually, which corresponds to the phase of full moon.
During a lunar eclipse, Earth comes between the sun and the moon so that all or part of the sun’s light is blocked from the moon, according to NASA.

Four partial solar and two total lunar eclipses are set to take place in 2011, which NASA said is “rather rare”; it will only happen six times in the 21st century—2011, 2029, 2047, 2065, 2076, and 2094. Wednesday is the first total lunar eclipse of the year, however. Another one will occur on December 10.

Unfortunately for those in the U.S., however, it won’t be visible from North America.

During a lunar eclipse, Earth comes between the sun and the moon so that all or part of the sun’s light is blocked from the moon, according to NASA.

Where will you need to be to view the eclipse? The entire event will be visible from the eastern half of Africa, the Middle East, central Asia, and western Australia, Espenak said. Europe will miss the first part of the eclipse because it happens before moonrise, but—with the exception of northern Scotland and northern Scandinavia—Europeans will be able to see totality. Eastern Asia, eastern Australia, and New Zealand, meanwhile, will miss the last stages of eclipse because they occur after moonset.
Hidden from the sun, the Moon does not disappear as one might think. In passing through the Earth’s shadow, the moon will take a coppery tint more or less red, characteristic of twilight land. This remarkable phenomenon is caused by the refraction of light from the Earth’s atmosphere that illuminates the lunar surface.

The Moon visible through a telescope, binoculars or the naked eye, provided that weather conditions are conducive. The AFA will broadcast this event live on its website.

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