Politics World

David Cameron denies a bargain in favor of Rupert Murdoch

LONDON (Reuters) – On Sunday British Prime Minister, David Cameron, has categorically denied that it favored the media empire of Rupert Murdoch in exchange for political support of his newspapers.

He stood with his culture minister Jeremy Hunt in this case.

The head of government is placed on the defensive when approaching local elections scheduled Thursday in much of Britain.

After a month of bad news in the Murdoch case and on the economic front, with the return of the recession in the first quarter, a survey showed that intentions to vote for the Conservative Party were at their lowest level since 2004.

In a televised interview on Sunday, David Cameron has ensured that no agreement had been reached with Rupert Murdoch, age 81, to promote the efforts of his media empire to acquire the Newscorp BSkyB satellite package in exchange for a support for the 2010 parliamentary elections.

“The idea of some grand bargain between me and Rupert Murdoch, that is not true,” Cameron told the BBC. “I do not do things or change my policies to suit this proprietor or that proprietor. That is not the way I work, and I will say that under oath.”

The inquiry headed by Justice Brian Leveson on wiretapping practiced by the Murdoch group’s newspapers revealed the close relationship that once existed between the media magnate and the British government.

The committee consists of the Murdoch case is scheduled to meet Monday and agree on the formulation of its final report, which originally was to be released at the end of last year. It will actually be released Tuesday.

HUNT, A “GOOD MINISTER”

An advisor to Jeremy Hunt, Minister of Culture also responsible for press affairs and who had overseen the offer and on BSkyB before the Murdoch retired in July, resigned Wednesday following the release of emails showing that had been in close contact with NewsCorp in this case.

Now the Labor Party in opposition, calling for the resignation of Jeremy Hunt himself and asks Cameron to open an investigation into whether the minister has violated the ethical code of its function.

David Cameron said that there was no basis to say that Jeremy Hunt had violated rules and said that there would be no inquiry into the minister, unless his testimony before the commission Leveson does not reveal new facts.

“If the prime minister put the same energy into defending hundreds of thousands of jobs up and down the country as he is into Jeremy Hunt – one person in his cabinet – then he might not be losing trust so quickly.”

Asked whether he supported his minister to 100%, David Cameron said that Jeremy Hunt, who is also responsible for organizing the Olympic Games this summer in London, doing a good job and had not yet had the opportunity to defend himself.

“It is these people who have had to suffer because of the financial disasters of recent years and it is immoral,” the cardinal told the BBC. “It is not moral just to ignore them and to say ‘struggle along’, while the rich can go sailing along in their own sweet way.”

“It is these people who have had to suffer because of the financial disasters of recent years and it is immoral,” the cardinal told the BBC. “It is not moral just to ignore them and to say ‘struggle along’, while the rich can go sailing along in their own sweet way.”

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