World

China extends the scope of national security

L'arrivée du président Xi Jinping en 2012 a été marquée par un durcissement de la position du gouvernement chinois face aux éventuelles dissidences qu'il pouvait rencontrer.
The arrival of the President Xi Jinping in 2012 was marked by a hardening of the position of the Chinese government against possible dissent he could meet Photo credit:. © Jason Lee / Reuters / X01757

The Chinese parliament Wednesday adopted a new law on national security, which gives the authorities even broader powers, in particular to control the Internet.

 

The Chinese regime continues to expand the list of its fundamental interests. The National Popular Assembly (NPA) on Wednesday adopted a new law to strengthen national security. In addition to ensuring the territorial integrity of the country, this Act extends its scope to Beijing activities in space, in oceanic waters and in the polar regions. And, of course, the Internet. This law is meant to allow China to “take necessary measures” to ensure the government full control of infrastructures, populations with their aspirations and the Internet.

This new text illustrates the will of the government Communist to establish its sovereignty and “secure and control” Chinese space. The law, adopted almost unanimously by Parliament – 154 yes and one abstention – highlights the will of the regime to silence its people, even if China asserts that this law seeks to defend “the fundamental interests of the people.” The arrival of the President Xi Jinping in 2012 was marked by a hardening of the position of the Chinese government against possible dissent he could meet.

Strengthening censorship

China, which has the largest population of internet users in the world, defends its right to censor the Internet in the name of state security and its “sovereignty” on the Web. The new law allows the authorities to strengthen confidence in the press and in the internet. It aims to ensure “the political and social security, while managing the company on the domestic front.” This serves as a pretext for the government to censor the Internet advantage, already filtered by the “Great Firewall”, a Chinese project that blocks access to certain pages of social networking, microblogging, or pages containing keywords such as “democracy” or “Arab Spring”. Yet the Chinese constitution states in Article 35 that guarantees freedom of expression and of the press for its citizens, as reminiscent of the some Chinese intellectuals and some fringe frames the regime.

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